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Social Life in the Early Republic Anne Hollingsworth Wharton

Social Life in the Early Republic

Anne Hollingsworth Wharton

Published January 9th 2012
ISBN : 9780217996181
Paperback
154 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1902. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... XII MID-CENTURY GAYETIES THEMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1902. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... XII MID-CENTURY GAYETIES THE Washington life of the days of Presidents Van Buren, Polk, Taylor, and Fillmore presented many of the characteristics that distinguish it to-day. Although the city has spread out upon lines of beauty, and muddy streets and inadequate sidewalks, over which cows and pigs rambled at will, no longer annoy the visitor, as they did M. de Bacourt in 1840, the capital still retains a certain simplicity and homelike charm that belonged to it in earlier times. Then, as now, the presence of many foreigners in the diplomatic service gave to this city a cosmopolitan character, while a generous, warm-hearted hospitality which belonged to its social life, being distinctly American, has not disappeared amid the growth and expansion of the larger city, with its stricter code of social and diplomatic etiquette. In addition to the official circles and the changing population of Washington, it has always possessed an attractive and interesting society, composed of the old families of the District and of those who, having gone there upon business, have yielded to its attractions and made it their home. Lady Emmeline Stuart Wortley, who visited Washington in 1849, while keenly alive to certain crudities and incongruities in its life, found much to admire in the beauty of its public buildings and the graceful hospitality and intelligence of its citizens. M. de Bacourt, on the other hand, looking always through glasses dimmed by prejudice, saw nothing but the defects of the rambling village-like capital, which he was pleased to call his prison. After being hospitably received at the White House by Mr. Van Buren, whom he had met on the Continent, the French diplomat had nothing more favorable to say of the President than that his politeness was fin...